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Tuesday, March 27, 2007

on tenterhooks.

How exciting was this to watch? I was on tenterhooks all night watching the seesawing motion of seats and votes between the Parti Liberal Quebec and the Action Democratique Quebec. I was in Montreal during the 2003 provincial election (hanging out in Russell Copeman's Notre Dame-de-Grace riding) and I don't think that election came close to how tense this one ended up becoming.

I'm not going to pretend I understand Quebec Provincial politics, so I'm going to refrain from offering any sort of indepth analysis. That said, I don't think it can be understated how big of an impact this realignment of the PLQ-ADQ-Parti Quebecois shift will have on Quebec and National politics. Does Mario Dumont's ADQ's Official Opposition speed up the Federal Election timeline? Will Premier Jean Charest survive Quebec's first minority government since 1878? What does third place mean for Andre Boisclair and the Parti Quebecois?

8 comments:

Ken Chapman said...

What do you think this means for Canada-Quebec relations?

daveberta said...

Difficult to say. In terms of Quebec-Federal relations, it seems like it's good for the Conservatives. With the two main parties now of a closer ideological stripe to tje Harper Conservatives (Charest being a conservative) I would think that it would put the Tories in a better position than before. I'm not sure the anger towards the federal Liberals has died down in Quebec (even with Dion as leader). It can't be good for the BQ - having their cousin party flounder in the polls. I've heard talk of Duceppe jumping to the PQ level, but I'm not sure it looks so appealing now (or maybe the challenge will be more appealing).

In terms of Quebec relations with other provinces, I think it's too early to tell. I think Charest will be too busy attempting to manage a minority while watching his political back to be overly involved on the National scene. I wonder what sort of minority/coalitions could be created. Perhaps Charest will govern as if he had a majority...

daveberta said...

Also, just as interesting should be how the Federal and other Provincial governments respond...

robspierre said...

I couldn't believe how close Sherbrooke was at certain points of the evening! It almost looked as if Charest was going to lose his own seat.

I would say that this is a defining moment in Quebec politics - the resurgence of the old Union Nationale in the form of the new ADQ. Social conservative, old Quebec, rural, Catholic. It's clear that the Quebecois the stagnant politics of the Liberals and PQ.

It is the dawning of a new conservative day in Quebec!

Anonymous said...

The Liberals blown to minority.
The ADQ as Official Opposition.
The PQ now in third.

Say hello to Canada's 2007 federal Election.

Glen said...

The Quiet Counter-Revolution.

Bogg said...

Once again, punditry is proven to be as useful as weather forecasters.

Anonymous said...

Stephen Harper and the Funky Social Conservatives must have big fat fucking grins on their faces right now, as do I.

:D